Friday, August 11, 2017

Nice Jews Please Stop Stereotyping Me: Bieganski and Israel 411

I came across the piece, below, on Facebook. It was attributed to the Facebook page Israel 411.

The Israel 411 Facebook page is here. Ironically, Israel 411 gives its mission as "Our goal is to shed some light, show the truth and expose the endless lies told about the State of Israel and the Jewish people."

My Facebook friend, who is Jewish, shared this story, endorsing it as heroic and inspirational.

In fact it paints an ugly picture of brutal, violent, greedy, callous Poles destroying Jews in Poland during WW II.

Here's the problem -- the woman so stereotyped is in fact a rescuer who saved a Jewish baby from death.

The story, far from commending her, depicts her as a monster.

Here's the second problem -- *no one* has any idea if this image is factual. There were no quotes from witnesses to the actions described.

The storyteller made up negative details about a dead Pole. And added them to a story about a Polish woman who saved a Jewish baby from death.

And people are now circulating this on Facebook, with no factual support, insisting it is an inspirational and heroic story.

Shame. Shame on every last person who shares this bigoted piece of hate mongering, racist propaganda.

Alert me if you have evidence that this story is true. I find no names of places, no dates, and the  only named person is a Rabbi.

Israel 411, you want to clear up lies about Jews. And you spread lies about Poles.

Israel 411Like Page
August 6 at 2:34am ·
The Most Amazing Story....

When a train filled with a large transport of Jewish prisoners arrived at one of the Nazi killing centers, many Polish gentiles came out to watch the latest group as they were taken away. As the disoriented Jews were gathering their possessions to take with them into the camp, a Nazi officer in charge called out to the villagers standing nearby, "Anything these Jews leave behind you may take for yourselves, because for sure they will not be coming back to collect them!"

Two Polish women who were standing nearby saw a woman towards the back of the group, wearing a large, heavy, expensive coat. Not waiting for someone else to take the coat before them, they ran to the Jewish woman and knocked her to the ground, grabbed her coat and scurried away.

Moving out of sight of the others, they quickly laid the coat down on the ground to divide the spoils of what was hiding inside. Rummaging through the pockets, they giddily discovered gold jewelry, silver candlesticks and other heirlooms. They were thrilled with their find, but as they lifted the coat again, it still seemed heavier than it should. Upon further inspection, they found a secret pocket, and hidden inside the coat was .... a tiny baby girl!

Shocked at their discovery, one woman took pity and insisted to the other, "I don't have any children, and I'm too old to give birth now. You take the gold and silver and let me have the baby." The Polish woman took her new "daughter" home to her delighted husband. They raised the Jewish girl as their own, treating her very well, but never telling her anything about her history. The girl excelled in her studies and even became a doctor, working as a pediatrician in a hospital in Poland.

When her "Mother" passed away many years later, a visitor came to pay her respects. An old woman invited herself in and said to the daughter, "I want you to know that the woman that passed away last week was not your real mother ..." and she proceeded to tell her the whole story. She did not believe her at first, but the old woman insisted.

"When we found you, you were wearing a beautiful gold pendant with strange writing on it, which must be Hebrew.

I am sure that your mother kept the necklace. Go and see for yourself." Indeed, the woman went into her deceased mother's jewelry box and found the necklace just as the elderly lady had described. She was shocked. It was hard to fathom that she had been of Jewish descent, but the proof was right there in her hand. As this was her only link to a previous life, she cherished the necklace. She had it enlarged to fit her neck and wore it every day, although she thought nothing more of her Jewish roots.

Some time later, she went on holiday abroad and came across two Jewish boys standing on a main street, trying to interest Jewish passersby to wrap Tefillin on their arms (for males) or accept Shabbos candles to light on Friday afternoon (for females). Seizing the opportunity, she told them her entire story and showed them the necklace. The boys confirmed that a Jewish name was inscribed on the necklace but did not know about her status. They recommended that she write a letter to their mentor, the Lubavitcher Rebbe ZT"L, explaining everything. If anyone would know what to do, it would be him.

She took their advice and sent off a letter that very same day. She received a speedy reply saying that it is clear from the facts that she is a Jewish girl and perhaps she would consider using her medical skills in Israel where talented pediatricians were needed. Her curiosity was piqued and she traveled to Israel where she consulted a Rabbinical Court (Beis Din) who declared her Jewish. Soon she was accepted into a hospital to work, and eventually met her husband and raised a family.
In August 2001, a terrorist blew up the Sbarro cafe in the center of Jerusalem. The injured were rushed to the hospital where this woman worked. One patient was brought in, an elderly man in a state of shock. He was searching everywhere for his granddaughter who had become separated from him.

Asking how she could recognize her, the frantic grandfather gave a description of a gold necklace that she was wearing.

Eventually, they finally found her among the injured patients.

At the sight of this necklace, the pediatrician froze. She turned to the old man and said, "Where did you buy this necklace?"

"You can't buy such a necklace," he responded, "I am a goldsmith and I made this necklace. Actually I made two identical pieces for each of my daughters. This is my granddaughter from one of them, and my other daughter did not survive the war."

And this is the story of how a Jewish girl, brutally torn away from her Mother on a Nazi camp platform almost sixty years ago, was reunited with her Father.

Text Via Cindy Greenstein Vaughn
Pic Israel 411, source Yad Vashem.

Adapted from the book "Heroes of Faith

5 comments:

  1. Sue, I had to repost this to fix something and your comment got lost. Would you like to post it again?

    ReplyDelete
  2. Sue Knight's Blog has left a new comment on your post "Bieganski and Israel 411 Facebook Page":

    If this story is true, then I am so glad the baby and her rescuer made it through. I had already got the message that Dutch rescuers are good, and Polish rescuers are horrid, but I suppose the article does underline it.

    And I do wonder who these mysterious Nazis were?

    All I would want to say on the site (beyond asking who the Nazis are in the current version) is that I have already got the message that us Poles are More Horrid Than Anyone else in Time and Space (thanks) as the most powerful media and academe in the world has been telling me so for long enough. But IF there is someone out there - in OuterPlanetistan perhaps? - who hasn't yet got the message then this article will be very helpful to them.

    Thank God I am trying to be "no part" of the world. And this article certainly reinforces the wisdom of that course - I will say that for it.

    But what a century of horrors it was. And I wondered if you are aware what a significant date 1914 was in Bible prophecy? (I wasn't, for many years.) It marked a time of great trouble on the earth- the Book of Revelation explains why.

    And it also assures of the coming rescue. So close now. So let me close with this lovely promise, as an antidote.

    "With that I heard a loud voice from the throne say: “Look! The tent of God is with mankind, and he will reside with them, and they will be his people. And God himself will be with them.  And he will wipe out every tear from their eyes, and death will be no more, neither will mourning nor outcry nor pain be anymore. The former things have passed away.” (Revelation 21:3,4)

    Isn't this what we are praying for when we say the Lord's prayer and ask for God's Kingdom to come?

    The rescue is being offered to all who will take hold of it. And the dead will not be forgotten at that time.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I see you refound and reposted my comment. thanks.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I have now reviewed nearly 2,500 books on Amazon. Believe me, I have seen far worse Jewish Polonophobia than you show on this blogspot.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I do sometimes wonder how you keep going in the face of all the hate Jan, but thanks for doing so.

      What keeps me going - in a smaller way - is the constant clear and loving Bible education we get at the Kingdom Halls. That straightens everything out. But without it...

      Delete

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