Friday, January 18, 2013

Poles: A Reliable Ally in Operation Foxley

An interesting find from a Google image search of "assassinate Hitler" source 


Operation Foxley document 

During WW II, the Allies hoped to assassinate Hitler. One attempt, Operation Foxley, hoped to make use of a Polish assassin. Otto Gross, L8 researcher, alerted me to this plot and I thank him for it. Otto mentioned to me as he shared this information, "It's interesting that the Allies chose a Pole as a potential assassin, given that nowadays Poles are so frequently depicted as collaborators with the Nazis."

Yes. The Bieganski phenomenon is part of an attempt, in recent years, to position Poles in the historical slot best filled by Nazis.

Yes, there was powerful and destructive anti-Semitism in Poland in the interwar era. Yes, there were deadly anti-Semitic Poles during and after WW II. No, the Bieganski project is not justified by either fact. Any questions? Read the book, as Prof. John Connelly might say: Read "Bieganski."

Otto Gross' original research on a little known WW II era mystery, the destiny of the L8 or Ghost Blimp, is here.

Some National Archives documents on Operation Foxley are here.

4 comments:

  1. Here's another blog's take on Operation Foxley:

    http://polishgreatness.blogspot.com/2011/12/secret-polish-forces-of-ww2-silent-dark_06.html

    ReplyDelete
  2. Don't forget the fact that one of the first, if not the first, attempt on the life of Hitler was conducted by Poles. This took place in 1939 in German-occupied Poland. When Hitler had his victory march in Warsaw, dynamite had been wired near the main street and connected to a detonator. A spotter was hiding, ready to signal another person to set off the charge the moment that Hitler was at that spot.

    Unfortunately, the Germans moved Poles away in the last moment, and so the spotter could not signal the man in hiding to set off the detonator.

    How would the course of history been different, if at all, had the assassination attempt against Hitler succeeded?

    ReplyDelete
  3. Thanks for the mention, Di.

    I wish I had enough cycles to research this one more. It was new to me and it has the making of a great tale.

    Besides the big-screen story factor I think it also underscore how the Allies thought about Poland.

    This came from the British National Archives site but when I was working at the Science and Technical Reports room at the Library of Congress in DC that warehouses the NDRC/OSRD papers I had to focus on radar, MAD, and the L-8 but they have the papers from foreign organizations they interacted with.
    Hope to someday find something that might put a dent in the misconceptions about Poland.

    re: Killing Hitler.
    It's discussed by some of the things I've read that were written just at the end of the war. One interesting thought is that killing Hitler early in the war may have lead to the fall of England. Hitler, besides being nuts, was a terrible soldier. Had he been assassinated, a Rommel or Doenitz would have been more successful and then sued for peace.
    Germany would also have developed the Bomb. The man who ended up the archivist for the NDRC discusses Hitler, science and the Bomb. The biggest hurdle was that Hitler would not listen to science that came from Jewish sources. He would not listen to "Jewish Physics". German scientists who suggested a Jewish scientist - borrowed intelligence through spies or forced labor - was right put their careers (and the ability to breath) in jeopardy so they started "inventing" things under there own names.
    If they had killed him before the war, I'm not sure the war would have occurred at all or, if so , it would be a limited war. I can only imagine how European history in the 40's and 50's would have changed and whether the Cold War would have occurred. Or the Space Race....

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Otto, thanks for that info about how the timing of a potential Hitler assassination would have affected world history.

      Delete

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